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Foam Rolling and Low Cadence Intervals

The latest episode of the podcast has a couple interesting but not simple to answer questions.

 

These questions are really a matter of who you are, and what you are trying to do. What is your goal?

A second question is to ask what you are trying to do and what the main thing that you need to do is? If you want to mountain bike you should mountain bike. The other stuff (foam rolling, really low cadence, foam rolling, ice paths, altitude etc.) are just the extra 1% that you might add after you have done your time on mountain biking (or your goal)

Think about those ‘world class basics’ or the 80:20 concept … what makes the good people good? Is it the crazy balance exercises or the time they spend in the goal sport that isn’t as glamorous to post on social media?

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Polarized or Threshold?

A Common Question I get is whether someone should do polarized or threshold/sweet-spot training

 

I have done several articles on the different types of training individually (threshold, HIIT, Polarized) but to find your own way can be tough. We all want to be part of a ‘camp’ or club (e.g. CrossFit). For training intensity and the organization of training the concept of polarization and threshold are not so opposed in my opinion ( The podcast guests we have had agree with this in general). The important thing is you have a goal, assess where you are now and then progress logically towards that goal by following a plan that you adjust frequently as you respond (or don’t). Many times the mistake is doing moderate training daily (no-off days) versus doing 2 threshold workouts weekly.

 

Polarized vs. sweet spot 

 

I think this is ultimately a matter of planning phases of training and making sure easy days are easy, that there are off days and that the interval days are progressing (whether that is ‘threshold/sweet spot’ Or tempo or HIIT/VO2.   Using only sweet spot, or HIIT, every workout (all year) was never really the intended method of utilization but sometimes it is taken as this absolute.

 

There are several ways to plan/periodize training depending on the athlete and their experience/limiters/goals: 

 

 a) you may do Vo2/sprints to get going and increase the QUALITY of your training and then your endurance racing approaches then we would become more specific with more tempo/sweet spot work to increase the QUANTITY of work you can do. (this might be called reverse periodization)

 

 b) to Accumulate ‘fitness’ with a base phase if you have time. Perhaps by using increasing amounts of sweet spot and tempo and some endurance to build your fitness (CTL). Then you can ‘polish off’ that fitness as you specialize/taper to your event, generally with a Vo2/anaerobic/HIIT block ahead of races

 

  c) You can do a mix of interval types over 7-14 day blocks to keep all aspects maintained and shift the focus slightly as required by limiters/races

 

I personally like the 3rd option, but I use all three with clients. How we plan this depends ultimately on who you are, where you are coming from and where you want to go ( POINT A -> POINT B )

 

 

You could also get a custom plan and get 100% MADE for your goals, schedule, race dates => Apply Here

 

Any Questions please follow up!

How to include group riding in your training (without giving up your goal)

I wrote a post for MapMyRun recently on ways to include group riding in an effective training routine.

You can read the mapmyrun article on optimizing group rides here

The trouble with group rides is that they are often not specific to the goals we set, they are often moderately hard but missing the specific work that many athletes need to do to improve. I work with masters aged athletes, most of whom have goals in the off-road disciplines (mountain bike, Cross, gravel). Most of these age-group cyclists are understandably drawn to the social and/or competitive nature of group rides; it is how they are spending their limited personal time. The trouble for these specific off-road athletes is that they often misspend their energy on-road group rides, then wonder why they are too fatigued to do an appropriate volume of mountain bike riding.

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