Kinesiology

Tag Archives — Kinesiology

How is your IT band? + Leg Pain

This is a new, updated version of an old post responding to the below question about IT-Band Pain. I have adjusted the content to be more general to leg pain common to cyclists and endurance athletes generally. 

It is OK to get Help! 

Try some of these modifications and ideas but it is rarely a bad idea to go see a local, trusted practitioner who has helped you or similarly athletic friends – this could be a Physiotherapist, Chiropractor, Osteopath, Massage Therapist, Kinesiologist or other practitioner. These sessions can provide some ideas for reducing pain now and progressing back to your sport gradually. The benefit of seeing someone is also in the psychological benefit of talking to someone about your concerns and perhaps having the benefits of touch generally.  

How Did It Start?

  • Consider things you have done that are in exceess of your usual or very different in terms of volume or intensity (ie. did you do a really long ride? or Lift really heavy weight?) 
  • Read: Are you Training to Much on the SmartAthlete Blog
  • Your Training Log can help (ie. Training Peaks? or something in one of those wearable watches?) 
  • Position? Did you change the position on your bike (and then do something listed above?) Be cautious with changes to your position / movement by reducing the volume/intensity. A New position, bike-part, whole bike, cleat/pedal setup (or old parts) can be part of the issue! 

Listen to Greg Lehman talk about pain science on the Consummate Athlete Podcast and how psycho/social aspects can influence our pain sensation

Rest – Sometimes We Don’t Need to do anything! 

  • While it is  tempting to roll, stretch, ice, get massage, get chiro, get supplements, get cremes, get braces … sometimes we just need rest and to leave that ‘hot’ area alone. 
  • Can you (have you) taken a few days to let your body recover? Often we can treat our pain and soreness with adequate rest. This can be a complete off day or even just a day (or three) where you do a different type of activity or movement (ie. swimming or pilates instead of cycling).
  • Move differently is a solution sometimes but complete rest (again) can be under-appreciated. Dr. Stuart McGill in his books (including ‘Back Mechanic’) discusses how surgery often ‘works’ because we are forced to take time off. If you have an ongoing/chronic issue consider a ‘fake surgery’ where you skip the scalpel and just take 2 weeks off before gradually easing back into your sport. 

Change Something

As a Registered Kinesiologist, I love the idea of foam rolling, stretching and movement but we need to be careful thinking we can spend enough time stretching each day to compensate for hunching over our desk, bike and dinner plate and also need to be careful thinking movement is the only thing that influences pain (ie. we may just need to rest and relax!). 

Sleep, Nutrition, Lifestyle factors (stress) can all influence our sensation of pain (read more about Greg Lehman’s ‘Cup’ Analogy)

Are you doing something in your daily life you could modify? This could be a nutrition, stress reduction techniques or more movement/posture oriented changes like a pillow between the knees or under the low back, or cruise control while driving or a walk at lunch to change up our routine, enhance digestion and reduce stress. 

‘Easy’ Habits

I like things we can do once and they are set. The Shoes we wear, beds we sleep in, seats we sit in, and options for movement we setup (ie. book into a class or lunch massage) are ways we might shift loads and stimuli we are exposed to each day without adding another thing we have to motivate ourselves to do each day. Many of my clients have pushed ‘walking meetings’ and phone calls to get outside and move more. Often the meetings seem to go better! 

Listen to Katy Bowman talk about how ‘movement matters’ On the Consummate Athlete Podcast. Those little movements each day can add up! 

Try to Add Variety into your day – while it is tempting to say ‘stop sitting’ this is very challenging for most of us (and frustrating!) Thinking of ways to sit differently and vary position is perhaps more workable. 

WHAT TO DO WITH PAIN NOW: 

  • You can ice that ‘hot spot’ to reduce pain. This is not a long-term strategy but can reduce pain initially. 
  • You can roll above and below the area (or stretch/move those areas) … try to think above and below more then right ontop of the sore/painful area (give that spot a break!) Mobility Wod on Above/Below concept
  • Ensure your bike-fit is suitable. Generally, front of knee pain comes from a saddle that is low or too far forward. Back of knee pain from a seat that is too high or too far back. Mark your current position then make a small change and see if its better!
  • Try to avoid painful ranges/sports/movements for a few days and see if you can focus on moving in different ways. This might mean using a different bike (clueing you to a bike fit issue?) or a different sport like going for a walk, swimming, upper body strength etc.
  • Your Knee alignment in the movements you do *may* be a way to influence your pain. Hip and foot exercises can help enhance your athletism, which may then also influence the knee position. mobilitywod video discussing this knees out in stair climbing

 

If you do not have a local therapist, or you are visiting Collingwood, Ontario we can work together in person or consider a phone/skype consult. Booking is here. 

 

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Exploration – A Bike Skill to Practice and Coach ?

I talk a lot about this idea of skills. I use skills for traditional ‘bunny-hop’ type skills and also more practical or theoretical tasks we must accomplish while on bike, such as drinking, eating, pacing. One skill I have been working on more and more with clients is exploration.

IMG_8438  A Group of Awesome, Smart Athletes Have finding endless trails and gravel roads to explore getting ready for Leadville

Exploration, as I am using it, encompasses training and moving in a fashion beyond intervals and numbers. It includes a willingness to be a beginner, get lost, to have an ‘imperfect’ ride, to ride longer/shorter then the plan and to think about navigation and where we are in the world. The more I see athletes explore their movement and their environment the more I see them finding additional reasons to ride/train/race OUTSIDE OF RESULTS. Navigating new areas, learning new skills, enjoying an adventure with friends all improve wellness, fitness and–I am suggesting– performance.

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Team Quebec Touring the Best Roads in Oxnard, Ca 

Health and Wellness for athletes has been the main goal behind ‘smart athlete’ since I started out on my own as a coach. While I have always loved adventure and ‘crazy’ trails/rides this is not something I have really taught or encouraged much. Over the last year it seems the more I share my own personal love of exploration and help others start exploring the more they start ‘enjoying the journey’. By Exploration I mean taking new routes, trying new skills, doing the same workout a bit differently. So this applies to both movement practice (skill work) and actual route choice and training-partner inclusion in training.

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Three of my favorite adventure buddies, Mitch,  Adam, and Eric, and I exploring around Monteray, Ca

 

Tools for those who want to use Tech to ease into Exploring:

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Talking about the adventure is at least half of the enjoyment!

I find that athletes, especially those with training plans, coaches and/or goals often loose the fun in riding/moving and focus too much on ‘training perfectly’; they become very externally focused on numbers/results. As this exploration and socialization is lost the ability to go out and ‘train’ everyday eventually becomes very difficult, even for the most introverted and dedicated athlete. We can ride the same route–or the trainer–for a year and do ‘perfect’ workouts but this monotony and singular focus will eventually lead to burnout. There is a time for very focused workouts but it is not nearly as much as we think. I have moved more and more in my own training towards being about 80% ‘perfect’ most days and aiming to be a bit more tight in the final weeks before a big event.

group ride scott cooney jamie smart athlete 2010

Group of Smart Athletes Getting a Tour of 3 Stage

 

3 Ways you can add more exploration to your training

1) Take a different route, even just trying a new road or path as an out and back, every time you ride. You will quickly learn to connect different areas and expand your options.

2) Try different lines, especially on familiar trails … often there are older less worn in routes, more technical routes or even less efficient routes that challenge your movement ability.

3) Look at a map before and after you go – right out some road names and try exploring. Just leaving the house without a direction can be good but often leaves us doing the same old thing. After you have an adventure make sure you pull out a map and figure out where you were so that your own mental map is improved.

4) Join a group ride or let a friend do the navigation, even if they don’t know where they are going. Often fresh eyes make awesome discoveries … even a dead end can be an awesome spot to be.

5) Try taking a skill session or getting a tour in a new area or even in an area near your home. Riding with others can open up new trails very quickly.

 

 

Peter

P.S. If you are looking to ease into Coaching Check out Pre-Made Plans on Training Peaks OR get a 100% Made for You Plan at SmartAthlete.ca

 

Kinesiology now a claimable medical expense


CANADA REVENUE AGENCY (CRA) – KINESIOLOGISTS LISTED AS AUTHORIZED MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS FOR THE PURPOSES OF CLAIMING MEDICAL EXPENSES:

Kinesiologists in Ontario have been added to the list of “Authorized Medical Practitioners by province or territory for the purposes of claiming medical expenses” on the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) website at this link: http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/ndvdls/tpcs/ncm-tx/rtrn/cmpltng/ddctns/lns300-350/330/ampp-eng.html
 
Persons receiving services of a Registered Kinesiologist in Ontario can now claim it as an eligible medical expense paid in 12-month period ending in 2013 and not claimed by you or anyone else.
 
Patients/clients can only claim the part of an expense for which they have not been or will not be reimbursed. However, they can claim the full expense if the reimbursement is included in their income, such as a benefit shown on a T4 slip, and they did not deduct the reimbursement anywhere else on their income tax and benefit return.
 
For more information on the Medical Expense Tax Credit see:  http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/tchncl/ncmtx/fls/s1/f1/s1-f1-c1-eng.html#p1.20
 
Another step in the continuing recognition of the profession, and kinesiologists.

Mobility and Movement – Some Updates, Refreshers and Rules of Thumb to Try

*this is from the weekly Smart Athlete Newsletter, Signup Here to ensure you get this weekly update 

Mobility and Movement

Movement is my passion. Seeing people grasp basic movements on and off bikes gets me excited.

When we are not moving as well as we would like or in pain it can be quite frustrating for the athlete and also for the coach/therapist.

The important thing is always to stay positive and SOLUTION FOCUSED. What can we try or change that might help?

Often we develop habits that do not help our situation. When in doubt try doing things differently or adding variety.

Some ideas for your mobility and movement

1) Move frequently.
    => Many (most?) of us move often enough and in a variable fashion.
    => How could you sit/type/stand differently ? Can you ride your bike standing & sitting ?
    => If you are a cyclist & work at a desk could you incorporate yoga and/or hiking and/or strength training for variety ? (without being sore for a week?)

2) If/When You Can’t Move Frequently.
    => Focus on avoiding poor positions (slouching, weird sleeping postures, optimize driving posture) to minimize damage & mobilizing you need.
    => Mobilize to help overcome the effects of being in compromised positions (sitting, cycling, or anything in excess)
    => ‘Mobility Wod’ is a great resource. ***Easy way to access the free/older videos via Youtube

3) How to Mobilize.
    => Don’t do too much at once, keep it simple and focused on your 1-3 main trouble areas.
    => 5- 20min , 1-3 areas/movements , minimum 2min per area, go slow and BREATHE = if you rush/cram it is not worth doing.
    => focus on improving a position you want to get into (ie. cycling position, bottom of squat, arms overhead, standing with hips open)            
    => Rolling, Contract/Relax and oscillating in and out of the ‘end point’ of the stretch are preferable to traditional static stretch in most cases.
    => rolling each glute (butt cheek) for 5min each and then moving in and out of a lunge stretch (back foot up or down) for 2-3 min each is good place to start.

4) More Free Info !
   =>Below is a free chapter to Crossfit Endurance’s book “Power, Speed, Endurance”(buy here) by Kelly Starett of Mobility Wod
   => This is a 1-2 hour circuit you can do 1-2 x a week and get great results. Doing this whole routine will really help you isolate your ‘big 2 or 3 movements’
   => Free Mobility Chapter is Here in .PdF

5) Even More Info!!
   => A more slowed down and systematic explanation may be Network Fitness / Jeff Alexander.
   => http://smr.networkfitness.com/primary-regions/

6) Get Help.
  => A Great way to learn about mobility and work on your limiter areas is to get a Kinesiology assessment. Book Yours Now.
  => I am always looking for small groups and locations to spread the movement and mobility word. If you have a space and a few friends. Let’s do a group session.

Peter
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Episode ZERO

A New Project has come from many different influences, suggestions and inspirations.

The Goal of the Blog ? 365 days of Bike Skills Ideas to augment your ‘Training’

We (cyclists in general) spend way to much time ‘training’ and forget about all the little things that go into actual performance. The ‘training’ matters and I love it but we need to ‘up our game’ and spend more time on all the other important stuff that goes into game day performance.

The other important stuff ?
Anything that is going to improve Your Bike skill. Mostly on bike skills but look for lots of influence from Nutrition, Mobility, Bike Mechanics, Cross Training, strength training and Coach/Athlete interviews.

The Characters ? Anyone I can get on camera with me, sharing ideas and their angle

The Mission Each Day : Find a Bit more Safety, Confidence and Speed on the Bike

And So It Begins …

*Please spread the word*