Smart Athlete

Category Archives — Smart Athlete

How to include group riding in your training (without giving up your goal)

I wrote a post for MapMyRun recently on ways to include group riding in an effective training routine.

You can read the mapmyrun article on optimizing group rides here

The trouble with group rides is that they are often not specific to the goals we set, they are often moderately hard but missing the specific work that many athletes need to do to improve. I work with masters aged athletes, most of whom have goals in the off-road disciplines (mountain bike, Cross, gravel). Most of these age-group cyclists are understandably drawn to the social and/or competitive nature of group rides; it is how they are spending their limited personal time. The trouble for these specific off-road athletes is that they often misspend their energy on-road group rides, then wonder why they are too fatigued to do an appropriate volume of mountain bike riding.

Continue reading

April 2018 – MTB Group Sessions and Gravel Training Rides

Please see below planned dates for sessions and gravel training 
 *I am always open to location, date, time suggestions
 
Tuesday, March 27 – Joyride Foundational Skills – 3 pm group session, 5 pm Private session
 REGISTER

Saturday, April 7th – Don Valley – MTB Group Session – 10am – 12 noon 
 REGISTER
Sunday, April 15th – Gravel Training Ride (Kanza, Leadville etc) – 9 am Mansfield Ball Park
*CX or Gravel bike, 2-3 hr hilly ride with the option to do less
  Register

Saturday, April 21 – Dufferin Forest MTB skills – 10 am – 12 noon – Group Session
Register
Saturday, April 28 – Dufferin Forest MTB skills – 10 am – 12 noon – Group Session
Register
Sunday, April 29 – 9 am – 12 pm – Dufferin Advanced Gravel Ride 
  *option for shorter routes and/or an afternoon beg/int ride upon request

  Register

Saturday, May 5th – Durham Forest or Woodnewton (Uxbridge) OR Don Valley
– Please email to express interest in either of these areas

When Should You Start Training for Your Goal Race?

When clients are looking at starting with coaching or getting a training plan, they will often ask … “When Should I Start Training?”

It is a reasonable question  … Why start training now for something so far away, like Ironman, Leadville, Breck Epic, Road Stage? You have lots of time to get fit and to prepare for this goal. Or, at least, it seems like that now.

I usually respond with, “Why Not Start Training Now?”

If you had to be somewhere in an hour for something really important, wouldn’t you leave with a little extra time? You could always grab a coffee, or go for a walk if you get there early. Now If you are like me, the ‘being early’ thing is tough. It rarely happens, even though I leave earlier then I think I need to. Detours, traffic, and gas-station lines seem to always conspire to make time tighter than I thought. So… it is nice to have that time in order to deal with those delays and detours.

In athletic training, it is the same: if we know we are going to have to complete a task, a goal, a race, a tour, a challenge of some type, then why not start preparing now for success? It would be very rare for training to go exactly as laid out. There are little injuries, illnesses, work trips, bad weather, winter and other little ‘stops’ that we will have to add into that perfect event preparation we envision.

I consider all of the clients that I work with as athletes. That means that there should be a year-round focus on improving some aspect of our game. In September and October, that may be improving our ability to have fun on the bike, starting to cross-train slowly and work on any mobility/injury aspects we have. Heck, we might even try some meditation or yoga to work on the recovery or mental side of sport and performance. Working on nutrition (Great book = Fuel Your Ride)  or dealing with those pesky saddle sores are other areas that work well during this ‘off-season’.

Check out a book to help with Saddle, Sores and Other awkward questions you might want to ask about Saddle Sores.  

The months go quickly.

I like the idea of ‘big scary goals‘. Sometimes we need to do something beyond what we think we can or different than we have in the past. I signed up for an Ironman last year, having never done a triathlon or really swam. I committed to it about 12 months out. I started researching and going to swim lessons and getting the gear I would need that month (goggles, road running shoes, etc). Even though I started early, there was still a crunch on time given the usual work and life responsibilities that popped up during the year! I definitely enjoyed having some extra time to let my feet adapt to running on pavement, train my brain to learn how to swim and not panic in open water, and to deal with a couple of small injuries along the way. The event went really well!

Training has many elements.

If you are doing a big race like Leadville and Dirty Kanza, and even stage races on the road and MTB, you may not do 6-hour rides in October, but you certainly could do a couple hours on the bike that you think you will race, with the gear you currently have, in order to see where the weak points are. There are lots of areas in our race day performance we can work on year-round:

  • Perhaps get a friend who has done the event to come out with you and tell you about it while your ride. This insider info is valuable to add to your own experience.
  • You could take care of any bike skill issues like cornering, flat-change, or log hops to make sure you stay upright on event day (and in training).
  • Get started strength training now (perhaps with this quick routine) will let you learn the movements and become resilient before you start being concerned about your on bike numbers again.

When considering when you should start to prepare for your event remember that it is nice to take your time and not be rushed in many aspects of life. Training is no different.

An Example: 10 months Out From August Marathon/Stage/Endurance race

( I like examples! )

  • October – Preparation phase – start strength training, assess body composition and improve if limiter, assess injuries and improve before starting training, assess skills and develop! Try Yoga
  • November – A few rides outside, start prepping further for cross-training (ski, hike, run etc.), ease slowly into these, strength progresses to moderate loads/reps. Weekend cyclocross course.
  • December – Strength is heavy and the focus this month, if no injuries are present. If you are injured, focus on injuries. Intervals should focus on most limited ranges. Take 1-2 weeks low focus/intensity/volume at holidays.
  • January – Resume training with lighter endurance, a traditional base-1 phase as the New Year kicks off. Show up daily. Keep strength/mobility progressing. Sleep a lot.
  • February – Work on limiter intensity 1x weekly, work traditional muscular endurance 1-2x weekly (tempo/threshold), build endurance time in low-end ranges (cross-train)
  • March – Progress from last month, keep showing up and progressing intensity/volume, keep sleeping. Strength should be mixed up, if adapting well some power/jumping/Olympic may be added.
  • April – Depending on early season race goals, this may include more intensity and race-specific focus. Strength in maintenance.
  • May – Start the final build for big race. Building muscular endurance, some shorter early season races, a long weekend block to provide extra endurance boost
  • June  – Building muscular endurance and race-specific preparation, equipment mostly finalized. A bigger prep race (1/2 distance, 100km for a 100 mile etc)
  • july  – Final Prep / Build – long rides with a few blocked weekends around the long weekends, planning for reduced life/work stress around the event. Final travel preparations.
  • August – Race!

Rather than cramming in training, enjoy the never-ending process of improving your fitness and bike skills. Indeed, the preparation is often the most fun and remembered part of big events! 

So… Why Not Start Now?

 

 

 

 

The Perfect Workout

 

Are your Workouts Perfect?

 

New cyclists are often frustrated by not being able to do a workout or training plan 100% as laid out. The dirty secret is that the best athletes don’t do 100% of their training, they adjust daily based on their context, things like how they feel, weather, training partners, terrain etc. How you feel today is a big one, not every day is going to be the perfect day where you can max out and set a personal best. A lot of days are tough, a lot of days are just normal. Too often, I see athletes quitting workouts because they faded slightly in their last interval or got tired, or they didn’t meet their best ever workout. An athlete might have a set of 3 x 10-minute intervals at 250 watts, but quit because they did 245 watts, an obvious failure, or is it?

FAILURE
There is no failure, especially when we are looking at small differences (remember no device is 100% accurate, nor can output metrics (wattage) account for daily changes in your body and environment (heat/altitude/gradient/indoors vs. outdoors). A Smart Athlete should focus on the goal for the day and how they can best achieve that on that day. The goal may be a certain time around threshold, a few hard hill repetitions or just an easy (EASY) endurance ride. If the workout or the plan gets too far from your context then that is a great time to talk with your coach or consult with one.

Book a Phone Consult to talk about your Training

I like the phrase ‘Non-Perfect Success’, I doubt I invented it but I associate it with the two below phrases: 

1) 80% is a passing Grade

The workout that is 100% perfect is not worth it and given most workouts do not account for your own personal context (weather, gear, recovery etc) it is likely that 100% perfect is not perfect for you. Get the main idea of your workout, get close to the target, do as much of the laid out week as you can. Adjust for obvious times you can do more because you slept well or got the day off. If you don’t sleep, have a giant saddle sore, or you just feel off.

To adjust try intervals at the low end of the zone, reduce the number of intervals or shorten the ride slightly. The 3 x 10 example in the introduction is actually 98% perfect, but I see athletes frustrated by this lack of ‘perfection’ often. If you have 5 x 4-minute hill intervals 4 x 4 is still in the Vo2 target range, as is 5 x 3.  Do a bit less and come back tomorrow with a smile. This daily adjustment is the advantage of coaching versus a stock training plan, but at all levels, there are decisions that athletes need to make to complete their workouts.

Listen to me talk 80% is a passing grade on Consummate Athlete Podcast

2) 90% of life is showing up (and finishing)

The main tenant of my philosophy is finishing what we start, not just races, but workouts because they are what make for race day success. Plan out your day, your week and your season. I use google calendar, Evernote and training peaks. Incorporate your life/work/family schedules and find the time you can train and sleep and eat and take care of yourself. Show up for life and workouts prepared to do the work. Finish the workout with your best effort for the day, avoid quitting unless there is an emergency.

Finishing today always allows for an adjustment to an easy day tomorrow and gives us a data point in the *FUN* experiment that is your training. If you think you SHOULD quit ask yourself what you are thinking you SHOULD do PERFECT? Take a short break and resume your effort. If you find yourself quitting often circle back on WHY you are training and make sure you are preparing for the day, week and block/season ahead.

Read a post about finding your WHY and Post Event Burnout 

Whatever your goal is and whatever plan you are following make sure you are showing up each day for Non-Perfect Success. Get a great grade but not a perfect one. Leave time to have some fun, sleep enough and take your time (it is YOUR time after all).

Peter

This was a recent newsletter. Get the most recent content by subscribing HERE

P.S. Check out the 7-Day Smart Athlete Healthy Kickstart to start working on those off bike factors that help you SHOW UP each day

7-Day Smart Athlete Kickstart To Healthy Living

Are you looking to improve your healthy habits?

Many athletes struggle with off-bike habits that cause weight gain, poor sleep, and recovery. This free 7-day course helps you kickstart those habits.



I Quit Coffee: Convenience, Routine & Dominoes

This post has been updated in November 2017 as I undertake another break from Coffee. I hope you find it useful in motivating a small tweak of your own — PG


The key takeaway:

Small changes can sometimes have large, domino effects that we can’t anticipate or foresee. Given enough time, these changes can be meaningful and paradigm-shifting. I am not suggesting you stop drinking coffee, but rather, I am sharing this story of my last month in hopes that you will tinker with small changes in your life to see if something better is possible.

Coffee had become central to my daily routine, many friendships and to my identity as a coffee lover (my twitter profile pic has coffee in it). As May came to an end, the time seemed right to tinker with this apparent touchstone in my daily life and central tenant of my identity. Between two of my biggest coffee-loving friends moving away, the 3-day stomach virus that had me off food/drink for 3 days, and no major events ‘requiring’ caffeine for a month, the time was right to take this out and see what changed. Despite being a coffee lover, I had generally rotated my stimulants and dosages daily (green tea one day, coffee the next, nothing another day). I was able to avoid caffeine and vary dosage with stress (e.g. travel, high training load). I have periodically stopped for days and weeks to ‘come down,’ for convenience or to try for a performance bump. With all that said, these periods without coffee were rarely more than a couple of weeks and seldom without decaf coffee.

Changing habits is tough. Getting started and interrupting the routine is a big part of that. I have had good success changing habits personally by using sickness as the jump-off point. Basically, whenever I get sick, I try to change something (e.g. bedtime, cutting out a certain food etc.). This past month, I turned a stomach virus and 3 days without food/drink into the first 3 days of my coffee abstinence. Like any addict, I insist that coffee doesn’t affect me and that I don’t need it, but if I am honest there was a low-grade energy dip for the first 1-2 weeks followed by the expected, and clichéd, sensations of steady energy, focus and clearing fog (that, or I was recovering from a 7 day stage race and 3 day flu). What I did not expect was how other habits and routines would change with the exclusion of my coffee habit.

I used to think that my coffee habits were part of my routine and that they helped me get my daily work/train/recover routines rolling. I thought that they helped me get out the door and enjoy long drives. I now believe that my coffee prep was actually delaying all these things and taking time from working, training, recovering and fun. I remember when I started drinking coffee, I never prepared it at home. I would have a cup with friends at a coffee shop, on a long ride or at a friend’s house if they had a superb method of preparation and good beans. This slowly transpired into me owning a large percentage of the methods for coffee preparation and making coffee (several times) daily just for myself at home often, when I could have been recovering, relaxing, napping, working, socializing or riding. Somewhere along the line, the original purpose of the coffee, klatching, was lost. Having coffee at home was not accomplishing what I originally started using coffee for.

Interestingly, this past month, without a conscious choice, I fell into a routine of going to bed early (9-10 pm) and waking with the sun (6-6:30 am usually) feeling well-rested and motivated to work. I would do my normal morning routine of HRV testing/meditation, bathroom, maybe start some slow-cooking breakfast and then with a big glass of citrus water with sea salt. I would sit down to my biggest, most daunting task of that day, which I chose the day prior. I would spend 30-75 min on that task (pre-determined time/deadline) and bust it out. Then around 7-7:30 am, I would have a relaxing breakfast before resuming work on the other tasks, which were so much easier. It seemed that coffee was like the first hard-to-move domino that started a chain reaction of positive choices. Being up and getting the big task done, no distraction from emails, coffee prep/cleaning seemed to set the rest of the day into motion. All of the other daily tasks (email, work, train, eat, nap, work, train, eat, house stuff) seemed to fall into place much smoother.

Stopping this month, locking up the coffee-making tools, made me realize that the time spent making/prepping coffee and cleaning a white kitchen could be spent on way more productive things that then domino into bigger and better output and better life experiences. If nothing else, it is simpler, and this lessening of ‘to dos’ is certainly a nice feeling.

As this month away from coffee ends, I celebrated with a glass of decaf espresso while recovering in the Porter Airport Lounge from a somewhat stressful ‘country boy’ journey to the Toronto Island Airport (too many modes of transit/not enough parking on grass). The machine and beans were ok, the price was right, my first ‘business’ flight experience was worth enjoying and I had some good conversation with some ‘fellow’ businessmen, which made the situation a great time to indulge. This was a good afternoon and didn’t dirty my kitchen or take time away from my day/large tasks. While this coffee experience was good, it pales to how good my days have felt after getting a big task done (e.g. this new website), or getting in a ride with a friend, or having time to relax and go for ‘beers on the beach.’ The domino that is coffee just isn’t the life I want. I will still partake when the company, location, beans, and method align, but I don’t see coffee coming back into my life beyond those good times.

Looking for help with changing routines and integrating training into your life?

Wondering what tweaks will help your training?

Book a Skype Consult for only $25!

How to Hop Logs in 5 Steps

Have you been trying to get the log hop figured out?

 

Do you want to learn how to bunny hop your bike? This post outlines the 5-step system that I use in Smart Athlete bike-skills sessions around North America. We use this system for cyclocross racers learning to barrier hop, roadies wanting to hop curbs and potholes and, of course, mountain bikers bunny hopping logs.

Thanks to Canadian Cycling Magazine we have some super production of my 5-step system to share. This is the basic system I use to help athletes of all abilities get better at logs. This might be a pro looking to hop giant logs smoother, or simply avoid race-ending flats. For beginners getting that first front-wheel-lift is so motivating. Whatever point you at in your log hop/bunny hops give these steps a try.

Regardless of the step that you are on, remember all of these steps are used during a ride. Sometimes we jump things and sometimes we pummel over them!

Whether you are new to cycling or an expert, taking time to review the 5 steps we use on the trail and road to clear obstacles is worthwhile. There is always an element we can progress, using higher logs, more abrupt roll-overs, more speed / less speed. Enjoy the never-ending process of moving your bike over obstacles!

Beginners often need to work on level 2 and 3 (wheel lifting) while advanced riders, who can do the Level 4/5 (‘bunny hop’), often surprisingly need help with level 1 to be smooth and over terrain at speed (rolling over things smoothly / rear-wheel awareness).
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FgyJ2CeoO4]

 

If you are looking to progress quickly or finding you are stuck on one of the stages why not try a skill session with Smart Athlete?

You can book one now via email (peterglassford At Gmail.com  or Book Now

Thanksgiving Survival

With the upcoming Canadian Thanksgiving and the American Thanksgiving not too far off (not to mention Pumpkin Latte Season …) it is a great time to share ideas for keeping your nutrition and fitness goals on track this fall.  Feel free to put yours in the comments below.

  1. Focus on the social side of events. Whether that is a coffee date with a friend or family Thanksgiving, you are there for the people.
  2. Don’t drink your calories – Cliche advice, I know, but it is unlikely your Thanksgiving memories revolve around alcohol or a glass of sweetened-milk disguised as coffee.
  3. Exercise that day – You will feel healthier if you move that day. Try the new Anywhere Core Video if you are unsure of what to do.
  4. Bring a dessert that fits in your goals – fresh fruit, paleo styled recipes like Apple Crumble (with nuts, not grain) and my favorite the Paleo Pumpkin Pie made with nuts, dates, and pumpkin. You could also bring main dishes or variations on parts of the meal you like. Molly at theoutdooredit.com has a few of our favorite dishes including Pico-de-Gallo, Guac, and Kale Chips
  5. Skip the white buttered-bun and any foods you don’t like that are not great choices anyhow (ie. don’t add gravy if that isn’t your big holiday treat)

Paleo Pumpkin Pie Season (this is my very rough directions – a full on recipe is linked below) 


a) in bowl slice/mash dates (with a bit of water if not fresh Medjool dates) then add 2 cups pecan (or choice nut flour) … pecan seemed to work better and not burn vs. almond/walnut mix of past
b) put in the oven for 5-10 min to ‘dehydrate’ or if you are kooky and have a dehydrator … do your thing
c) while dehydrating make the filling by combining about 2 cups pure pumpkin puree, 3 eggs, a lot of cinnamon unless you don’t like cinnamon, a pinch of cloves and nutmeg if you have it (i didn’t!) . Some maple syrup sweetens further to your taste, The dates and pecans add a fair bit of sweetness. 
    = For true chefs = a recipe that is close  https://blog.paleohacks.com/pumpkinpie-recipe/