Month: May 2018

3 Drills to Improve Balance on the Bike

This post will provide you with 3 drills to improve your cycling skills and balance. While they are not presented in the order I would always use and certainly a step (or three) beyond what a beginner may be comfortable doing they do provide you with some ideas and variations to scale back from, work towards or challenge yourself with today!

 

Covered today
1) The Outrigger – Putting a Foot Out for balance and to ‘dab’ versus falling over or putting out your arm
2) Ratcheting – use a partial pedal stroke and move your body around while STANDING
3) The bump and run – a fun challenge that progresses your ratchets and moves you towards the track stand

Let me know what you think of these 3 drills!

Bike Fit and Setup Mistakes

When I hear that bike riding is causing pain, I think of these few things first.

  1. You brake with any finger except your index finger – modern brakes do not require multiple fingers or middle fingers. Use your index finger. Many wrist, forearm and shoulder pain is aggravated, if not caused by this. At best you are using a lever in a different way than it was designed. Use all the fingers you can to hold onto the bar!
  2. Your cleats are not jiggly – replace cleats at least once a season (more if you ride more or dismount a lot, or only ride one bike/set of shoes). Watch for them to click, or feel jiggly during higher rpm or bumpy sections. This can cause lower leg and foot issues and also I have seen knee pain. When you install your cleats try the farthest back setting (on mtb cleats especially).
  3. Your seat is very far back on the rails or pointed up  – position yourself more forward (knee cap over pedal spindle or slightly ahead) so you are setup to lean forward and pedal up hills. A pointed up saddle is never indicated and is a frequent cause of numbness and saddle sores.
  4. Your suspension is not setup well – read your manuals or ask for help!
  5. Your saddle doesn’t agree with your pelvis – don’t settle for sores and numbness, look into bikefit help, try loaner saddles
  6. If you have knee pain in the front of your knee, try raising your saddle. If you have pain in the back of your leg (hamstring) try lowering your saddle.  Do this by taping your seat post and lowering 2mm at a time.

Losing Weight, Fueling Performance, Altitude and Heat – Stacy Sims

This episode of the podcast deals with so many awesome topics. These are common questions about extreme conditions like altitude and heat, and well just enduring all the crazy events that you do as an endurance athlete. Stacy has so much experience as a researcher, business person, and endurance athlete so this episode is a great one to listen to if you want to hear a simple, yet research backed answer to these difficult questions.

  • How to lose weight but fuel performance and not get sick?
  • How to be ready for altitude if you aren’t at altitude.
  • How to use a sauna or hot-tube to increase your endurance and heat tolerance.
  • Does your menstrual cycle affect training? How to improve your training by paying attention to your cycle? Working with your coach and including notes about your period in training peaks or the HRV or other apps.

Find the post notes and other links on the ConsummateAthlete.com or stream it below!

3 Drills to Corner Better

These are 3 drills that will help you progress your cornering skill

Cornering is a multi-faceted skill with unlimited variations. Just think about how many conditions a cyclocross racer would face, and then multiply that by how many bike types and styles of riding there are! Cornering a mountain bike in B.C. Canada will require different positions, braking techniques, and different tires than if you are in a more desert location like Sedona.

Like many sports, it is wise to do isolated drills to increase your number of repetitions and practice the exact skill you want to use in your adventures. By minimizing distractions and time spent getting to that perfect corner in the forest you can make a lot of progress.


These are 3 of my favorite corner drills.

  1. off bike – practice leaning the bike while holding your body position and while looking with your lean
  2. Leaning the bike while riding in a straight line – practice shifting your hips back and forth
  3. Cone Drills – Slalom and Figure-8 – these are common ‘bike drills’ but using them in tandem with the above and really focusing on your bike LEANING and your hips/gaze shifting will help you make huge breakthroughs

3 Podcast Episodes that Will Make You A Better Cyclist

The Consummate Athlete Podcast is a Podcast I run with my Wife, Molly Hurford (theoutdooredit.com)

The show has athletes, coaches, experts and, most importantly, regular people doing a variety of awesome things involving movement.

The goal of the show? To explore new and different ways to move that will make you better at your main sport(s) and a healthier and happier person. We have had parkour, biathlon, xc-skiing, and even dance! But who are we kidding? We are both avid cyclists and many of the people we know and many of the people we dream of talking to are cyclists.

If you want to be a better cyclist try these three episodes first. If you like the show we would love if you subscribe and try a few others that are more out of your cycling ‘safe zone’!

Geoff Kabush – How to be super fast on any bike (and set a beer+pushup record)

Download and notes: http://consummateathlete.wideanglepodium.libsynpro.com/mtb-coffee-sport-development-geoff-kabush

Stephen Seiler on Periodization, Polarized Training Concepts

Download and notes: http://consummateathlete.wideanglepodium.libsynpro.com/polarized-training-hiit-athletic-needs-steven-seiler

Frank Overton – Beyond Sweet Spot Training

Download and notes: http://consummateathlete.libsyn.com/beyond-sweet-spot-frank-overton

Subscribe to the Podcast on Apple Itunes – or – Google Play – or – Follow on Facebook – or – Check out our Webpage

Learn to Log Hop – Three Drills to Try

 

This is a video with three drills to try that I find help riders break through plateaus in their progression towards Log Hops, Bunny Hops, and Jumping.

The Three Drills include:

  • An off-bike drill that helps you feel what it is like to push into the handlebar and front wheel
  • A manual practice focused on moving your hips down then back in an L shape
  • A front wheel ‘tap’ drill that is functional for getting over logs but takes the first off-bike drill and applies the concept of pushing into the bars into this ‘level 4’

For a progression of the 5 stages of log Hopping check out my video that Canadian Cycling Magazine produced HERE