Month: March 2018

Apps to Improve sleep by minimizing blue light from screens

A Common question is how to improve sleep, perhaps by reducing screen time or ‘blue light’ exposure. This can be an easy adjustment to make on most devices, some changes are ‘native’ while others require you to download an APP. Reducing the screen time especially, and to a lesser extent, the brightness/blue light could possibly help reduce sleep disruption from screens.

Molly and I talked about our favorite apps and routines for productivity on this episode of the Consummate Athlete Podcast

While the stimulation (or stress) from emails and other online content can be a bigger issue than light the reality is some of us need or want to be on screens later at night. To reduce light exposure try these apps. The color on your screen will change when it ‘shifts’ to night mode, but most people adjust and don’t notice after a minute or two.

I find the light to be ‘campfire like’ and as it dims around 5 pm (or sunset) it is a good ‘stop reminder’ for me to shut down for the day and focus on family/friends and getting outside for some activity.

Flu.x is a popular App for PC and available for IOS

How To Use nightshift mode on iPhone 

Open settings on iPhone, scroll to display & brightness, select “NIGHT SHIFT”,  can schedule or turn on once and select the ‘screen temperature’ (I run mine quite dim all day and very dim at night)

for Google this is another app to adjust your screen :

How to include group riding in your training (without giving up your goal)

I wrote a post for MapMyRun recently on ways to include group riding in an effective training routine.

You can read the mapmyrun article on optimizing group rides here

The trouble with group rides is that they are often not specific to the goals we set, they are often moderately hard but missing the specific work that many athletes need to do to improve. I work with masters aged athletes, most of whom have goals in the off-road disciplines (mountain bike, Cross, gravel). Most of these age-group cyclists are understandably drawn to the social and/or competitive nature of group rides; it is how they are spending their limited personal time. The trouble for these specific off-road athletes is that they often misspend their energy on-road group rides, then wonder why they are too fatigued to do an appropriate volume of mountain bike riding.

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April 2018 – MTB Group Sessions and Gravel Training Rides

Please see below planned dates for sessions and gravel training 
 *I am always open to location, date, time suggestions
 
Tuesday, March 27 – Joyride Foundational Skills – 3 pm group session, 5 pm Private session
 REGISTER

Saturday, April 7th – Don Valley – MTB Group Session – 10am – 12 noon 
 REGISTER
Sunday, April 15th – Gravel Training Ride (Kanza, Leadville etc) – 9 am Mansfield Ball Park
*CX or Gravel bike, 2-3 hr hilly ride with the option to do less
  Register

Saturday, April 21 – Dufferin Forest MTB skills – 10 am – 12 noon – Group Session
Register
Saturday, April 28 – Dufferin Forest MTB skills – 10 am – 12 noon – Group Session
Register
Sunday, April 29 – 9 am – 12 pm – Dufferin Advanced Gravel Ride 
  *option for shorter routes and/or an afternoon beg/int ride upon request

  Register

Saturday, May 5th – Durham Forest or Woodnewton (Uxbridge) OR Don Valley
– Please email to express interest in either of these areas

When Should You Start Training for Your Goal Race?

When clients are looking at starting with coaching or getting a training plan, they will often ask … “When Should I Start Training?”

It is a reasonable question  … Why start training now for something so far away, like Ironman, Leadville, Breck Epic, Road Stage? You have lots of time to get fit and to prepare for this goal. Or, at least, it seems like that now.

I usually respond with, “Why Not Start Training Now?”

If you had to be somewhere in an hour for something really important, wouldn’t you leave with a little extra time? You could always grab a coffee, or go for a walk if you get there early. Now If you are like me, the ‘being early’ thing is tough. It rarely happens, even though I leave earlier then I think I need to. Detours, traffic, and gas-station lines seem to always conspire to make time tighter than I thought. So… it is nice to have that time in order to deal with those delays and detours.

In athletic training, it is the same: if we know we are going to have to complete a task, a goal, a race, a tour, a challenge of some type, then why not start preparing now for success? It would be very rare for training to go exactly as laid out. There are little injuries, illnesses, work trips, bad weather, winter and other little ‘stops’ that we will have to add into that perfect event preparation we envision.

I consider all of the clients that I work with as athletes. That means that there should be a year-round focus on improving some aspect of our game. In September and October, that may be improving our ability to have fun on the bike, starting to cross-train slowly and work on any mobility/injury aspects we have. Heck, we might even try some meditation or yoga to work on the recovery or mental side of sport and performance. Working on nutrition (Great book = Fuel Your Ride)  or dealing with those pesky saddle sores are other areas that work well during this ‘off-season’.

Check out a book to help with Saddle, Sores and Other awkward questions you might want to ask about Saddle Sores.  

The months go quickly.

I like the idea of ‘big scary goals‘. Sometimes we need to do something beyond what we think we can or different than we have in the past. I signed up for an Ironman last year, having never done a triathlon or really swam. I committed to it about 12 months out. I started researching and going to swim lessons and getting the gear I would need that month (goggles, road running shoes, etc). Even though I started early, there was still a crunch on time given the usual work and life responsibilities that popped up during the year! I definitely enjoyed having some extra time to let my feet adapt to running on pavement, train my brain to learn how to swim and not panic in open water, and to deal with a couple of small injuries along the way. The event went really well!

Training has many elements.

If you are doing a big race like Leadville and Dirty Kanza, and even stage races on the road and MTB, you may not do 6-hour rides in October, but you certainly could do a couple hours on the bike that you think you will race, with the gear you currently have, in order to see where the weak points are. There are lots of areas in our race day performance we can work on year-round:

  • Perhaps get a friend who has done the event to come out with you and tell you about it while your ride. This insider info is valuable to add to your own experience.
  • You could take care of any bike skill issues like cornering, flat-change, or log hops to make sure you stay upright on event day (and in training).
  • Get started strength training now (perhaps with this quick routine) will let you learn the movements and become resilient before you start being concerned about your on bike numbers again.

When considering when you should start to prepare for your event remember that it is nice to take your time and not be rushed in many aspects of life. Training is no different.

An Example: 10 months Out From August Marathon/Stage/Endurance race

( I like examples! )

  • October – Preparation phase – start strength training, assess body composition and improve if limiter, assess injuries and improve before starting training, assess skills and develop! Try Yoga
  • November – A few rides outside, start prepping further for cross-training (ski, hike, run etc.), ease slowly into these, strength progresses to moderate loads/reps. Weekend cyclocross course.
  • December – Strength is heavy and the focus this month, if no injuries are present. If you are injured, focus on injuries. Intervals should focus on most limited ranges. Take 1-2 weeks low focus/intensity/volume at holidays.
  • January – Resume training with lighter endurance, a traditional base-1 phase as the New Year kicks off. Show up daily. Keep strength/mobility progressing. Sleep a lot.
  • February – Work on limiter intensity 1x weekly, work traditional muscular endurance 1-2x weekly (tempo/threshold), build endurance time in low-end ranges (cross-train)
  • March – Progress from last month, keep showing up and progressing intensity/volume, keep sleeping. Strength should be mixed up, if adapting well some power/jumping/Olympic may be added.
  • April – Depending on early season race goals, this may include more intensity and race-specific focus. Strength in maintenance.
  • May – Start the final build for big race. Building muscular endurance, some shorter early season races, a long weekend block to provide extra endurance boost
  • June  – Building muscular endurance and race-specific preparation, equipment mostly finalized. A bigger prep race (1/2 distance, 100km for a 100 mile etc)
  • july  – Final Prep / Build – long rides with a few blocked weekends around the long weekends, planning for reduced life/work stress around the event. Final travel preparations.
  • August – Race!

Rather than cramming in training, enjoy the never-ending process of improving your fitness and bike skills. Indeed, the preparation is often the most fun and remembered part of big events! 

So… Why Not Start Now?